James Langton The guy on the right is WRE Murphy. The guy on the left is who I think it is. This photo was taken if my memory serves me right in Limerick well into the Civil War. Im not saying im 100% correct on this, but I know Seans 'Gait' as they say, and thats not it in the shake hands photo, (my opinion) By James Langton

By Mike Vernals:

Four Courts Irish civil war

Free State troops

By James Langton:

Eamon De Valera arrest in ennis

By James Langton:

IRA attack during the Civil War on Sean McGarrys shop, St. Andrews Street, Dublin, a pro Treaty T.D. for Weat Dublin, and a captain in the Free State army, was a particular target for anti Treaty hostility during the Civil War. Days after the execution of Mellows, Barrett, McKelvey, and O’Connor, McGarry’s home had been destroyed by an IRA arson attack. McGarrys seven year old son, Emmet, died shortly afterwards of injuries sustained in the attack. In Feb 1923, McGarrys business, an electrical fittings shop was bombed by the IRA. ( Dev condemed the attack on his home in which his son died)

By James Langton:

The Big Fella's burial.

By James Langton:

The staff at Galway’s Custom House guarded by Free State troops 1922

By James langton:

An IRA Active Service Unit during the Civil War at an unidentified location in West Waterford. A report by Pax Whelan to Liam Lynch, stated it was one of three ASU’s active in County Waterford just prior to Lynch’s death. The ASU was commanded by Paddy Curran, Glenmore and included; top left Dick Morrison, Clashmore, Mikke Ryan (with hat), Ballyquin and on his left, Tom Mooney, Old Parish.

By M vearnals:

A Peerless armoured car in action in Passage West, Cork following the landing of Free State troops during the Irish Civil War.

By Jimmy Behan:

Free State Armoured Car

By Mike Vearnals:

Drumboe Martyrs

On the morning of 14 March 1923, some six weeks before the end of the Civil War, four IRA Volunteers, Charlie Daly (26), Sean Larkin (26), Dan Enright (23) and Tim O’Sullivan (23), were marched from their cell at Drumboe Castle to an improvised firing range about 300 yards up a gently sloping field in the woods at Drumboe.
It was at this spot that the four men were executed by a Free State firing squad and their bodies were thrown into a ready-made grave.

The devotion of these men to their republican principles was never more evident than on that cold March morning in 1923, when the executors’ volley rang out in the woods of Drumboe.

By James Langton:

free state troops Heading for Kerry

Four Courts Under attack

attack on the four courts, in ruins

Armoured Car being loaded onto ship, heading for Fenit (in my opinion), Civil War

By James Langton:

Armoured Car being loaded onto ship,Irish Civil War,Free State troops

By James Langton:

Civil War,Free State soldier points out a booby trap under the leg of the bench

By Mike Vearnals:

This car was formerly known as "Danny Boy", the name being changed to "Tom Keogh" in memory of the late colonel, Commandant Tom Keogh, who was killed in a mine explosion in Macroom. During the hottest periods of fighting in Limerick and Kerry, "Danny Boy" as the car was then named, was ever in the vanguard and assisted in the capture of the following places in Limerick, Limerick city, Kilmallock, Bruree, Patrick's Wells, Adare, Rathkeale, Newcastle West, Abbeyfeale. Lieutentant O'Brien has been one of the crew since the war came south and was present when the car broke through three columns of irregulars at Kilworth camp, and inflicted several casualties to the enemy. The car was completely hemmed in, and barricades and broken bridges had to be negotiated before the gallant crew won through, after ignoring several calls to surrender. The car was taken to Kerry in September 1922, at the formation of the Kerry command, and took part in some stirring fights, notably the encounters at Killorglin and Castlemaine, and several ambushes in Tralee and Killarney.

28th September 1922, Condolence letter from Mary Powell (Michael Collins Sister) to Commandant Tom Keogh's Mother. Tom died 11th September 1922 in a masive landmine explosion which killed 9 free state soldiers. A republican prisoner was then shot in reprisal.

By Mike Vearnals:

Great photo Mike. I have this one which I got from Kilmainham. The guy in the middle seated front, is the man I mentioned in an earlier post on the Collins funeral, called Corry. (the guy with the cap on at the top of the steps) Collins asked him personally to take the job in Kilmainham and look after the boys.

By Mike Vearnals:

National Army troops from I st Bn, Dublin Bde land at the Cork Shipbuilding Co. Dock Passage West, Co. Cork, 8 August 1922. Given the secrecy of the operation the two men in civilian clothes watching them probably belonged to Arm/ intelligence,

By Mike Vearnals:

Irish Civil War, At least twenty-five Irish Republicans were assassinated in County Dublin in the period that the Oriel House CID was in existence, from early 1922 to November 1923, when under the control of the FSA Intelligence Department and later under the Ministry of Home Affairs, to when it was finally abolished. Most of these deaths, or the circumstances leading to them, were not witnessed, but several witnesses were there when the two Fianna boys, Alf Colley and Sean Cole were murdered at Whitehall, and again when three more Fianna members were arrested at Clonliffe Road and found murdered the next morning at Clondalkin. To Republicans in Dublin, during the Civil War period, the name Oriel House was synonymous with beating, torture, terror and death.

By James langton:

Rare Civil War photo, showing Free State Troops in Henry Street

free state troopers

By James Langton:

Crowds watching the battle for the Four Courts from a distance on the Liffey, back towards O'Connell Bridge.

By James Langton:

Four Courts under attack - Civil War

By James Langton:

Free State Troops chatting inside the gates of Beggars Bush Barracks after the handover/takeover. Note the two Policemen looking on. The gates are long since gone, and most of the buildings inside have been converted into expensive appartments. The Labour Courts are housed here (a new building), the Labour Museum (which is never open), and the National Print Museum were I trained and studied. The Print Museum is situated in the Garrison Chapel and has an original 1916, and a C/W Proclamations on display there.

By James langton:

Here is a rare one I hope you all like. Its a Free State dispatch rider, Civil War period.

By James Langton:

This is what was left of the home of M.A. Corrigan Chief Solicitor for the Irish Free State after a visit by Republicans during the Civil War. Location: Rathmines, Dublin.

By James Langton:

Free State Army 1922

Another rare one of Pro-Treaty forces

Civil War photo

Civil War 2

Check point Civil War

Wounded soldiers Civil War

Rare Civil War photo, showing Troops and the Dublin Fire Brigade at the Four Courts

Troops here at Fowlers Hall during the Four Courts Siege

By James langton:

Civil War photo Battle for Dublin, civilian being attended to

By James Langton:

free state Troops

By James langton:

Kilflynn Flying Column IRA 1922

By James Langton:

Civil War photo,Free State troops, at the cornor of Henry St and O'Connell St. The blast from the field gun is so powerful it shatters the windows beside the armoured car, note the shards of glass to the left of the photo.

By JL:

Pro Treaty Snipers

By JL:

Rare Civil War photo, I think this is inside the Four Courts, maybe the records office

By James langton:

A well known one and one of my favs. An Anti Treaty IRA unit Dublin Brigade walking down Grafton Street 1922

By

A deserted O'Connell Street 1922

By JL:

1923, Location: The Dublin Mountains. Detectives posing with weapons they found in an IRA arms dump

By JL:

Inside the arms dump

Arms dump 3

By Mike Vearnals:

Free State troops, Tipperary Town.

By MV:

Ambulance, Civil War