“Old Na Fianna Éireann” 4th Battalion

//“Old Na Fianna Éireann” 4th Battalion

The 4th Battalion “Old Na Fianna Éireann” has amalgamated with the Irish Volunteers Commemorative Organisation. At a meeting this week it was discussed and the Colours and members of the “4th Battalion Old Na Fianna Éireann” have been now officially absorbed in to and have become a part of the Irish Volunteers.

It is an honour for all our members, and a great act by the 4th Batt. of confidence in the ideals, in the aims and endeavours of the Irish Volunteers Commemorative Organisation. It is a with great pride that we accepted and welcomed the 4th Batt “Old Fianna Eireann”. It was an historic day for all concerned. We will do our very utmost to continue the proud traditions.

A brief history of Na Fianna Éireann

Fianna Éireann

The name Fianna Éireann also written Fianna na hÉireann and Na Fianna Éireann (Irish: “Soldiery of Ireland” or “Warriors’ of Ireland“), named after the  mythological Fianna, has been used by various Irish Republican youth movements throughout the 20th century.

Fianna Éireann, organised as a youth hurling league for boys and girls, existed in West Belfast around 1903 by Bulmer Hobson.  This was the brainchild of Bulmer Hobson, a committed IRB member. Hobson relocated to Dublin and the organisation collapsed in Belfast. In Dublin, Hobson became acquainted with Constance Markievicz, Helena Moloney  and others, who were all members of the newly founded Sinn Féin. They were members of the Drumcondra branch. Hobson told Markievicz of his Belfast experiment and the seed was sown with her. With Helena Moloney and Sean McGarry, Markievicz and Hobson soon recreated a new Fianna Éireann.

Bulmer Hobson aged 24

 

Countess Markievicz

As Na Fianna Éireann had been organised four years earlier than the Irish Volunteers, and that many of its members were now young adults, fully trained in many aspects of warfare, it was no wonder that many young members transferred over to the Volunteers in 1913. The original committee which set up the new volunteer movement had three Fianna members on it.

na fianna recruitment poster

Seamus Quirke as a Lt. in the Fianna Eireann.

Fianna Éireann 4th Batt. Book

fianna Eireann 4 Battalion Book

 

Fianna Handbook

 

Fianna Eireann 1915 Mansion House Dublin

 

As with all scouting organisations, an instructional handbook was a necessity. The job of producing this book fell to Seamus O’Riain. With articles from Patrick Pearse and Roger Casemnet, and advertisements from suppliers of uniforms and equipment, the first Fianna handbook appeared in 1913. It came at a time when the Irish Volunteers was founded and the book was widely used by this group also. Countess Markievicz bought a large rambling house at Ranelagh, Surrey House. It became the unofficial headquarters of Na Fianna for some time. The older boys would gather and train here, and a mini firing range was set up in the basement. The boys also had a radio set in operation and this led to a raid from the DMP. A proper HQ was later set up in D’Olier Street.

Na Fianna

 

The unveiling of the memorial over the grave of Terrence Bellew McManus and other 1867 leaders in Glasnevin Cemetery. Note the Fianna boys.

Gun running

Na Fianna played a major part in the Howth and Kilcoole gun-running episodes. Fianna members brought their treck-cart to Howth Pier to meet the Asgard. The treck-cart was full of homemade batons, and these were distributed to the Volunteers on the pier. The cart was then used to carry the surplus rifles back to the city. At Clontarf the DMP and British Military were awaiting the return of the volunteers and a confrontation ensued. Fianna officers made a quick decision and detoured with their gun-laden cart up the Howth Road, arriving eventually at Kilmore Road, Artane, where the arms were safely stored for future recovery.

Constance Markievicz with members of Fianna

 

Fianna Eireann training exercise 1915 Dublin

 

1916 Insurrection

Fianna was represented at all the garrisons that were involved in the fighting of Easter Week 1916. Even though they were now more heavily involved with the Irish Volunteers, Con Colbert and Sean Heuston  were still regarded as Fianna members. Colbert was under the command of Eamon Ceannt at Watkins Brewery, while Heuston was given the task of commanding the Mendicity Institution. Colbert and Heuston both were executed for their part in the Rising. In Galway, Liam Mellow was in command of activities, but he escaped capture and got safely to to the United States. Countess Markievicz, second in command to Michael Mallin at the College of Surgeons, was sentenced to death, but eventually reprieved due to her gender. After the provisional government abandoned the GPO, and set up HQ at Moore Street, James Connolly gave command of the GPO to Seán McLoughlin, a Fianna officer. His orders were to oversee the safe retreat of the rest of the occupants.

Several of the Fianna were killed in action at this time. Seán Healy was shot dead at Phibsboro  whilst delivering despatches, Seán Howard and Seán Ryan died in similar fashion. Volunteers under the command of Fianna officer Paddy Houlihan captured and burned down the Linenhall Barracks. Eamon Martin, a future Chief of Staff was seriously wounded at the Broadstone Railway Station. Possibly the first shots of the Rising were fired by Fianna officers who attacked and captured the Magazine Fort in thePhoenix park. Gerald Playfair, an unarmed teenager and the son of the fort commander, was shot andkilled by Garry Holohan as he

[Playfair] ran to raise the alarm at Islandbridge Barracks.

 

 

Fianna Eireann 1915

 

Seán McLoughlin (Fianna Éireann), in the ruins of the GPO.

Internment

At least  fifteenn Fianna officers from the Dublin Brigade were rounded up after the Rising and interned at Frongoch, North Wales.

One year after the Rising, a large demonstration was held outside the burnt-out shell of Liberty Hall. A large contingent of DMP, under an Inspector Mills, arrived and the Riot Act was read to the crowd. The police waded into the crowd with batons and Inspector Mills was struck a mortal blow to the head with a hurley stick. His assailant was Ernie Murray, a young  Fianna officer, who was O/C of a Sluagh on Parnell Square. Murray made off from the scene along Abbey Street, pursued by a DMP man. He was cornered at Marlborough Street, but he drew a revolver and the policeman backed off. Murray was secreted away to the United States, where he remained until the Truce of 1921.

 

Post 1916 reorganisation

 A provisional governing committee was set up in Dublin in May 1916, including Eamon Martin, Seamus Pounch, Theo Fitzgerald, Liam Staines and Joe Reynolds. All had evaded the round-up after the Rising. This committee functioned until January 1917, when it handed over command to the newly released senior officers.

Na Fianna was first to re-organise after the  Rising of 1916. In February 1917 a section of Na Fianna marched in full uniform to mass at Blanchardtown, County Dublin for Michael Mallin, who had been executed following the Easter Rising.

“As the police did not interfere, we got courage and got bolder and bolder. On one route march, the police at James Street stopped us and an Inspector of the DMP grabbed me. However, as the Fianna scouts became so threatening, I was released.”

(Witness Statement of Garry Holohan)

Na Fianna continued to defy the British ban on marching and parading, and drilled openly with hurleys in open defiance. This inevitably led to clashes with the DMP and the RIC in outlying areas. The most notable clash occurred in July 1917, when the whole Dublin Battalion went on a route march through the South City and County. Efforts were made by the DMP to stop the march and break it up at Terenure and Rathmines  DMP stations, but the paraders broke through the cordons at both points. The march continued to the GPO, where the parade was dismissed.

Seán Saunders recalled being arrested with at Milltown with Roddy Connolly (son of James Connolly) Hugo MacNeill, Theo Fitzgerald, Seán McLoughlin and Garry Holohan. (Witness Statement of Seán Saunders)

An intensive recruiting campaign had been set in motion throughou the city and county after the earlier reorganisation of January 1917, and it proved to be a tremendous success. Recruits came in large numbers and new companies were formed. In June, the Dublin Battalion had become so large and unwieldy, that it was decided to set up a Brigade structure of two battalions. The county was simply split in two, with the Liffey as the divide. South of the Liffey became the 1st Battalion and north of the Liffey became the 2nd Battalion. The Dublin Brigade Staff in June 1917 comprised Garry Holohan (Commandant), P.J. Stephenson (Adjutant) and Joe Reynolds (QM).

Fianna Munster

Army Agreement

It came to the attention of GHQ Staff c1918, that in many areas around the country that Na Fianna was being controlled by the local units of the Irish Volunteers. A meeting of Fianna GHQ representatives and Volunteer representatives was held in Dublin to discuss the problem. What emerged from this meeting was known as the Army Agreement. From that point on, the Volunteers would not seek to control Fianna in their areas. Those who reached the age of seventeen had transferred to the Volunteers ranks; this would now cease and any transfer would be voluntary. The volunteer O/C was to liaise with the Fianna O/C on all local matters, and due consideration was to be extended to Fianna.  During the “Tan War” Fianna members featured prominently in every brigade area. Some lost their lives or were imprisoned. In the picture taken of the West Mayo Brigade Active Service Unit in 1921, ten of the thirty in the photograph had been members of the Westport Fianna Sluagh, as had Tom Derrig, who rose to the rank of Adjutant General during the Civil War. (Westport Fianna Sluagh, Westport Historical Society Journal, 2007 publication.)

Fianna Eireann Ard Fheis 1919 Mansion House Dublin

Fianna scout Patrick Hanley, killed in action by the RIC in Cork, 27 Nov. 1920

Fianna scout Patrick Hanley, killed in action by the RIC in Cork, 27 Nov. 1920.

Truce

During the Truce, Na Fianna devoted a great amount of time to training. At least three full-time training camps were set up to train potential officers. Each prospective officer had to attend the camp for one weeks training. One of these camps was held at Kilmore Road, Artane and another at Kilmashogue Mountain. Na Fianna held discussions all over the country where they debated the terms of theAnglo Irish Treaty. At an Ard Fheis, Fianna rejected the Treaty and called for all to still work for a Republic. In support of this, the Dublin Brigade’s Fianna Éireann marched to The Smithfield where they were reviewed by senior Republican leaders. (Poblacht na h-Éireann, 16 January 1922)

Civil War

Fianna Éireann played a major part in the civil war fighting, especially in Dublin. When the Four Courts Garrison was attacked in July 1922, a second front was created to relieve the Four Courts. The Dublin Brigade, Fianna Éireann provided many leaders in this period. All along the eastern side of O’Connell Street buildings were taken over and barricaded. Parnell Square and Parnell Street were similarly barricaded. Fianna, under their new Brigadier, Seán Harling, took over 35 North Great Georges Street as a barracks.

Na Fianna Cole and Colley, killed during the Civil War

In August 1922 , Na Fianna Éireann sustained a heavy blow when two of their senior officers in Dublin, Seán Cole and Alf Colley, were shot dead by Free State Army Intelligence members at The Thatch, Whitehall.

Brigadier Alf Colley, killed during Irish Civil War at Whitehall, August 1922

2nd Battalion O.C. Sean Cole, killed during Irish Civil War at Whitehall, August 1922

Bodies of Cole and Colley at the Mater Hospital mortuary, 28 August 1922

 

Executions

The bullet-riddled corpses of three teenaged Na Fianna scouts Edwin Hughes (17), Joseph (16) and Brendan Holohan (16) were found at The Quarries, Naas Road, Clondalkin, on 28 November 1922. They were all from Drumcondra area and had been putting up republican posters in the Clonliffe Road district. They were arrested by Charlie Dalton (younger brother of Emmet Dalton) and Nicholas Tobin, two high-ranking Free State officers. The scouts were brought for interrogation to Wellington Barracks, where Free State Army Intelligence had their HQ. That was the last time that they were seen alive.

When the Free State started to execute Republican prisoners, the first to be shot were four young men who had left Na Fianna to join the Republican Army. They were followed by another group of three, who had similarly graduated from the ranks of the Dublin Brigade, Fianna Éireann. (“War News” No. 37, 3 December 1922)

Liam Mellows, executed on 8 December 1922

The executions of Rory O’Connor,, JoeMcKelvey, Liam Mellows, and Dick Barrett became a symbol for Na Fianna. They became known as “The Four Martyrs”. Until 1964, an annual concert was held by Na Fianna to commemorate their executions. A very prominent ex Fianna officer, Aodh MacNeill (son of Eoin MacNeill), officiated at the executions. Eamon Martin related that he was a cellmate of Mellows in Mountjoy Prison. It is now estimated that some 22,000 people were interned during the Civil War period 1922-24. Fianna Éireann was decimated with the loss of most of its officers and the organisation went underground until well after the general release of prisoners in 1924.

 

Na Fianna at the burial of the Countess.

 

The Countess lying in state at the Rotunda Rink. Her faithful Fianna at her side

 

Na Fianna Eireann 1

 

Na Fianna Eireann 2

 

Na Fianna Eireann 3

 

Na Fianna Eireann 4

 

Na-Fianna-Medal

 

Na Fianna Eireann Cert

 

Below is a list of all the Fianna killed 1913 to 1924, we also do not forget all the Fianna who died in later actions. God bless them all.

1913-1924

ROLL OF HONOUR Na Fianna Eireann

FUAIR SAID BAS AR SON SAOIRSE

FIAN   WILLIAM DAVERN   LIMERICK   2ND  JULY   1913

FIAN   PATSY O CONNOR   DUBLIN   17TH   JULY  1913

FIAN   BRENDAN DONELLAN   GALWAY   24TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN  SEAN HEALY   DUBLIN   24TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN   WILLIAM FRANK BOURKE   DUBLIN   25TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN   JAMES FOX   DUBLIN   25TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN   JAMES KELLY   DUBLIN   25TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN  GERARD KEOGH   DUBLIN 27TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN   SEAN HOWARD   DUBLIN   27TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN   FREDRICK RYAN   DUBLIN   27TH   APRIL   1916

FIAN   CON COLBERT   LIMERICK   8TH   MAY   1916

FIAN   SEAN HUSTON   DUBLIN   8TH   MAY   1916

FIAN  SEAMUS COURTNEY   CORK   18TH   JULY   1918

FIAN  JOSEPH REID   CORK   20TH   JULY   1918

FIAN   JOHN MURPHY   BELFAST   9TH   JUNE   1920

FIAN FRANCIS MURPHY   CLARE   13TH   AUGUST   1920

FIAN  SEAMUS QUIRKE   CORK   9TH   SEPTEMBER   1920

FIAN   SEAN DOYLE   DUBLIN   19TH   SEPTEMBER   1920

FIAN  CHRITOPHER LUCEY   CORK   10TH   NOVEMBER   1920

FIAN  PATRICK HANLEY   CORK   17TH   NOVEMBER   1920

FIAN  PATRICK TUBRIDY   LIMERICK   21ST   AUGUST   1921

FIAN  WILLIAM SMYTH   BELFAST   2ND   JULY   1921

FIAN  PERCY HANNIFIN   TRALEE   26TH   JANUARY   1922

FIAN  THOMAS SLATTERY   LIMERICK   2ND   APRIL   1922

FIAN  JOSEPH BURNS   BELFAST   18TH   APRIL   1922

FIAN  HENRY O CONNOR   ENNISCORTHY   26TH   APRIL   1922

FIAN  WILLIAM TOAL   BELFAST   –   MAY   1922

FIAN SEAMUS WHELAN   KILDARE   25TH   JUNE   1922

FIAN  WILLIAM CLARKE   DUBLIN   28TH   JUNE   1922

FIAN  SEAN CUSACK   DUBLIN   30TH   JUNE  1922

FIAN  THOMAS WALL   DUBLIN   1ST   JULY   1922

FIAN  WILLIAM DOYLE   NEW ROSS   28TH   JUNE   1922

FIAN  MICHEAL MOYNIHAN   LIMERICK   12TH   JULY   1922

FIAN SEAN COLE   DUBLIN   16TH   AUGUST   1922

FIAN  ALFRED COLLEY   DUBLIN   16TH   AUGUST   1922

FIAN  BERTIE MURPHY   CASTLEISLAND   19TH   SEPTEMBER   1922

FIAN  RICHARD NOONAN   CORK   11TH   OCTOBER   1922

FIAN  LIAM MELLOWS   WEXFORD   8TH   DECEMBER   1922

FIAN  JOE MCKELVERY   BELFAST   8TH   DECEMBER   1922

FIAN  MATHEW MORAN   WEXFORD   9TH   AUGUST   1924

FIAN JAMES PYNE   CORK   10TH   NOVEMBER   1924

Fianna Eireann monument St.Stephens Green Dublin

 

Dev hanging a wreath on the door of 34 Camden Street in memory of the Countess, where she was reputed to have founded the Fianna

Fianna Eireann Badge

 

By Brian Wickham

A BRIEF HISTORY OF NA FIANNA ÉIREANN IN CORK

Some time in 1910 or thereabouts, Tomas MacCurtain invited Countess Markievicz to Cork to organize a Sluagh of the Fianna in the city. The meeting took place in the city hall. Tomas MacCurtain, Seán Ó Cuill, Bob Langford, and Tadhg Barry, were among those who attended the initial meeting. After Madame had outlined the aims and objects of the organization, it was decided to organize a Sluagh in the city and later to set up Sluaite in the county.

Progress was slow at the start, but in 1912 a large number of Baden Powell Scouts left the British organization and joined the Fianna, and from then onwards the Fianna in Cork began to grow steadily. Estimated strength in the city from 1913 to 1914 – 30 to 40; 1914 – 40 to 50; 1915 – 60 to 80; 1916 – 80 to 100.

The Sluaite consisted of nine Fiannaidhe, eight boys and a Sluagh leader. The boys wore a plain green shirt and officers a double breasted tunic. After 1916, all wore the double breasted tunic. The I/C of the Fianna in Cork had the title of Scoutmaster up to the Munster Convention in 1915, which was held at Limerick. At the Convention it was decided to replace the title of Scoutmaster with the military rank of captain. Séamus Courtney of Cork was appointed O/C of Munster and he appointed Seán Healy O/C of Cork City and County.

The following were the officers commanding the county: Walter Furlong, a few months at the start; Christy Monahan, 1912 to 1913; Liam O’Callaghan, 1913 to 1914; Seamus Courtney, 1914 to 1915; Seán Healy, 1915 to 1918.

From 1914 to 1916, Seán Healy and Séamus Courtney organized a great many areas in the county, including Blarney , Clogheen, Cobh , Riverstown, Douglas , Blackrock and Youghal. In other areas the Fianna were pioneers in building up the volunteers.

Tadhg O’Sullivan succeeded Seán Healy as O/C of Cork , when Seán joined the Volunteers. He was succeeded by Frank McMahon. Tadhg was killed by Crown forces in Douglas St , Cork in May 1921. Seamus Courtney was arrested in 1917 and lodged in Cork jail where he went on hunger strike. This undermined his health and on his release his health broke down completely and he died. He was buried at Passage with full military honors. In 1921, the Fianna were re-organized into Battalions and Brigades along the same lines as the Volunteers. The O/C of the Cork First Brigade was Frank McMahon, who became Chief of Staff of the Fianna in 1922.

The Fianna mobilized for the Easter Rising, but were demobilized due to Eoin McNeill’s countermanding order. The Fianna had its own active service unit in each Battalion area. The work of the Active Service Units consisted mostly of raids on Belfast Boycott goods, food supplies for the British Army and RIC, the burning of British newspapers, post office mails and small cars, and raids for bicycles.

In 1920, Patrick Hanley was murdered by RIC in a series of murders in the Grattan Street area of Cork on the night of November 27 in reprisal for the shooting of an RIC sergeant. Hanley’s remains were laid out in his Fianna uniform, in the mortuary of the Mercy Hospital . The body was later removed to the church of SS Peter & Paul. He was buried in St Finbarr’s Cemetery, the Tricolor-draped coffin being shouldered all the way to the cemetery by the dead boy’s comrades. A volley was fired over the grave and the Last Post was sounded by the Fianna buglers. A short oration was delivered by a Fianna officer, who exhorted the boys to be inspired by the work of Patrick Hanley and to carry carefully the burning torch of freedom.

After the truce, when the Volunteers took over the barracks from the British, many members of the Fianna garrisoned them. During the Civil War, many members of the Cork City Fianna were on active service in areas such as Limerick Waterford, Kilmallock, Dungarvan and Passage.

After the evacuation of Cork City by the Republicans, Fianna was completely disorganized for several months. Some groups remained active in the Second Battalion area, under Frank Nolan. At a later stage, a unit was formed in the Blackpool area, and this unit became the Fianna Active Service Unit in Cork.

Above article by Brian Wickham.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/fiannahist.htm

Seamus Quirke as a Lt. in the Fianna Eireann. Killed in action by British Auxiliaries in Galway, Sept. 9, 1920. H Co., 2nd Battalion, 1st Cork Brigade.
Seamus Quirke as a Lt. in the Fianna Eireann. Killed in action
by British Auxiliaries in Galway, Sept. 9, 1920.
H Co., 2nd Battalion, 1st Cork Brigade.

Courtesy of Brian Wickham,
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/uniforms.htm#1

Fianna Eirean Cork 3

Fianna Eireann CORK, Seamus Quirke, Eugene Vaughan & possibly Sean Healy, Courtesy Brian Wickham,

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/uniforms.htm#1

Munster Fianna Eireann in Cork 1922

The photograph was taken on Easter Sunday, April 16, 1922 on the occasion of a meeting of the Fianna in Cork to determine their view on the Anglo-Irish Treaty. The group was drawn from Fianna members in the Munster area. The Fianna took an Anti-Treaty position and went on to fight on the Republican side in the Civil War.

Identified members in the photo
Second row, first on left, seated – Thomas Dargan, 16, Limerick
Third row, seventh from right – Kevin Bradshaw, Limerick
Third row, eighth from right – Joe Crowe, Limerick
Top row, ninth from left – James Wickham, 22, Cork .

Courtesy Brian Wickham, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/fianna.htm#1

Close up of the Fianna in Cork picture


Close up of the Fianna in Cork picture


Close up of the Fianna in Cork picture

fianna cork

fianna cork


Na Fianna Eireann Cork 1922
Courtesey Brian Wickham
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/

Mick Wickham – Volunteer Pipe Band 1916-21

Courtesey Brian Wickham

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/

Sources: Wikepedia, Brian Wickham, James Langton.
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/

By | 2017-09-13T15:09:35+00:00 April 19th, 2012|Fianna Eireann|34 Comments

34 Comments

  1. Alan Roche March 3, 2014 at 1:53 am

    Hello,

    Concerning the Munster Fianna Eireann in Cork 1922 photo shown above, my Grandfather Denis Woods is in this photo he is first at the top row very left wearing a suit. I have just found out from the release of the Old IRA Pension records that he served as the Hon Secretary for the Cork Old Fianna Eireann Committee in the 1930’s and 1940’s, his handwritten letters to the Old IRA Board requesting pension service be recognised for Fianna Eireann members are now found on the Militaryarchives.ie site. If anyone knows more details about my Grandfather’s service with Fianna Eireann please let me know. According to the archives he was Captain B Company Cork 1st Brigade and he was Anti Truce and arrested in September 1922. That’s all I know.

    • Spailpin December 1, 2014 at 3:59 pm

      Dia dhuit,
      Regarding the Fianna Roll of Honour. Patsy O’Connor’s DOD was not 17th July 1913 but was in fact 15th June 1915. He burial took place on the 17th June 1915. I have copies of both his burial records for Glasnevin & his death certificate. – There has been confusion down through the years as to his untimely death. He received a blow to head from a DMP baton on Bloody Sunday, August 31st 1913 but did not die until June 15th 1915. (Eamon Murphy who posts here will confirm same) – Brilliant site btw!!

  2. Patrick English November 8, 2013 at 5:03 pm

    My Father was 22 in 1916 and was a member of F Coy 4th Batt Volunteers. there was a picture of him (now lost) in the uniform of a Na Finna officer he looks about 17 or 18 in it.
    In some rough work on the back of a 1937 garrison order he lists Con Colbert as his Capitan and Laurance Murtagh as his Lieutenant and that they assembeled in the house of Christopher Duffy. He was in the GPO. This information is now in Pearse Street library along with his Frongoch letters I would be grateful for any information relating to him

  3. Paddy1992 May 23, 2013 at 1:30 am

    Does anyone know anything about James Pyne? He’s listed as to have died on hunger strike in 1924, a year after the civil war, but that’s all I can find. I’m investigating several figures for my own research, if anyone knows anything please let me know.
    Many thanks!

  4. Pat Dargan May 13, 2013 at 8:57 pm

    My father, Tomas Dargan was a member of the Limerick Fianna during the War of Indpendance and he is included in the 1922 photograph. He was arrested and detained in Spike Island from which I have a group photograph. He also fought with the Republican side in the Civil War and was detained in the Curragh. I also have a photograph of Thomas taken with the Limerick Fianna on his release in 1924. In addition, I have a range of other Fianna, War of Independance and Civil War material. i would be happy to share this, if it is of interest.
    Regards,
    pat

    • admin May 14, 2013 at 8:57 am

      Hello Pat,very interesting,could you e mail us photos at info@irishvolunteers.org
      Thank you very very much, Garry

      • Eamon Murphy May 29, 2013 at 1:41 am

        Great info there Pat. Garry could you pass these on to me too. Thanks Eamon

    • Kate Cowan October 7, 2013 at 11:12 pm

      Hi Pat,

      I just completed my thesis this month (on children in the nationalist community and their involvement in militant organisations) and I have mentioned your father quite a bit in one of my chapters. I would love to chat to you more about his experiences that he might of passed on, if you are willing. His witness statement with the Miltary bureau was enlightening and contributed a lot to my research and the direction I took.
      Kate

    • Eamon Murphy November 26, 2013 at 12:08 am

      Hi Pat could you contact me as I am interested in seeing your material. I am working on a little Fianna project. Please send an email to the admin here and he will pass on my email address. (Or Garry could you send me Pat’s email?)

      • Patrick English December 5, 2013 at 6:10 pm

        Hi Eamon
        What I have are My Fathers letters from the time he was in Stafford and Frongoch
        I know he was in NaFinna and then in the Volunteers at Easter. The letters make no reference to any of this. I also have some rough work he did on the back of a 1937 garrison report order to do with what he did while in the GPO.
        Your welcome to see it all but I don’t think it is what you are looking for
        Pat

    • Eamon Murphy December 13, 2013 at 3:39 am

      Hi Pat Dargan,
      I would be grateful if you could contact me. I am interested in your Fianna material. Please contact info@irishvolunteers.org and they will forward your contact details.
      Many thanks Eamon

  5. admin February 8, 2013 at 9:18 am

    BY EAMON MURPHY:
    Hi Kevin,

    I have compiled a list for you of some well-known Volunteers from the Gorey/North Wexford locality. I am also interested in the history of the Irish Volunteers in the Gorey area and have been researching this subject for a number of years. I have recently set up a facebook page dedicated to the ‘History of Gorey’ and for the page I have written a number of short articles about prominent Gorey men and women (Seamus Doyle, James Gleeson, Sean O’Byrne) involved in the 1909-1923 independence period. The page can be found here https://www.facebook.com/groups/197392687061192/ . The articles can also be found on the Irish Volunteers facebook page https://www.facebook.com/groups/irishvolunteers/ and a brief biography on James Gleeson can also be found on this site http://irishvolunteers.org/2013/01/james-gleeson/ .

    As a member of the Irish Volunteers organisation I am delighted to be able to assist you in your own research and hopefully the information below will be of some help. Please find links below which provide details/info/recollections of a selection of Gorey Volunteers for the mentioned period. I am busy with researching other men and women from the area and will let you know as soon as I have completed those studies. I would also recommend a selection of books by local historian Michael Fitzpatrick, who you may already know, which are based on the history of the Gorey region. The books include many references to Gorey Volunteers from the 1916, War of Independence and Civil War period. There are a total of six publications in his series of history books. The Bureau of Military History is also an excellent resource for information on the Volunteers of the period and I have provided links to several witness statements from their collection below. Best of luck with your research!!

    Sean O’Byrne, Gorey.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151465566740739&set=o.197392687061192&type=3&theater

    http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS0986.pdf#page=6

    James Gleeson, Gorey.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151458605800739&set=o.197392687061192&type=3&theater

    http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1012.pdf#page=1

    Surrender photo Enniscorthy

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=532536613429375&set=o.197392687061192&type=3&theater

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151269388555739&set=o.197392687061192&type=3&theater

    Sean Etchingham, Courtown, Gorey. (I am currently writing a short article on Sean and will post it later on the Gorey facebook page).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Se%C3%A1n_Etchingham

    Seamus Doyle, Gorey.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151269393750739&set=o.197392687061192&type=3&theater

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151269097875739&set=o.197392687061192&type=3&theater

    http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS0315.pdf#page=1

    Seamus Doyle and Sean Etchingham being escorted to Dublin to hear surrender.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151269391745739&set=o.197392687061192&type=3&theater

    Maire Comerford who was closely associated with the Gorey area and who lived there on several occasions.

    http://comerfordfamily.blogspot.com.au/2009/09/comerford-profiles-21-maire-comerford.html

    Some more members of the Irish Volunteers/IRA during the period 1909-1923 include:

    Patrick Carton of Leskinfere, Gorey was a member the Irish Volunteers in Camolin from 1914 and later a member of the North Wexford Flying Column in 1920. Also in the NW Flying Column with Patrick Carton around the same time were Jim O’Toole, Ballyduff, Gorey and Jimmy Kenny, Ballycale, Gorey. His witness statements can be read online here: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1160.pdf#page=1

    James O’Toole of McCurtain Street, Gorey was a Lieutenant of the 3rd Battalion, North Wexford Brigade in 1921. He was in ‘A’ Company (which was based in Ferns) of the same battalion from 1918. Others members of the North Wexford Brigade were Myles Breen (O/C), Patrick Kenny, Richard Humes, John and James Kelly (brothers), James Mythen, James Kenny, Aiden Kelly, Michael O’Brien, John Kinsella, Luke Byrne, Patrick Murphy, James O’Neill, William Cosgrave, Matt Flynn, James Kelly, Laurence Doyle, Thomas Dwyer, Aiden and Edward Murphy (brothers), James Barrett, Patrick Fitzpatrick, Andy Nolan, Thomas Maher, Maurice Spillane, Markie Kirwan, Thomas Doyle, Michael Maguire, John Quirke, John McGuire, James O’Toole and John Lawless. The following men joined later Michael Mahon, James Lawless, Peter Hughes, Stephen Pender, Tom Roche and Frank Gibbons. His memories of the period have been documented here at the BMH: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1084.pdf#page=1

    John J. O’Reilly of Raheenagurren, Courtown Road, Gorey was a member of the Irish Volunteers from 1914 and a member of the 3rd battalion, North Wexford Brigade in 1918 holding the position of Adjutant. John’s witness statement to the Bureau of Military history can be read online here: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1031.pdf#page=1

    Martin Dunbar, Railway Road, Gorey was a member of the I.R.B. from 1912 and the Irish Volunteers from 1913. He took part in activities during 1916 in Wexford. His brother Pat was involved in the 1916 Rising with him and they were both arrested and sent to Wandsworth prison in England and later to Frongoch. He was also in the North Wexford Brigade during the War of Independence (1919-1921). His recollections can be viewed here: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS0988.pdf#page=1

    Sean Breen of McCurtain Street, Gorey was a member of the Irish Volunteers and was 2nd Lieutenant of ‘G’ Company, 3rd Battalion, North Wexford Brigade (1919-1921). Michael McGrath and W.J. Brennan-Whitmore were officers of the original Gorey unit of the Volunteers in 1918 until it was re-organised into a proper brigade in 1919. Sean recalls Pat Fitzpatrick, Joseph Stafford, Aidan McCloud and Pat Redmond as members of the North Wexford Brigade in 1919. Interesting stories of local raids for arms can be found in Breen’s witness statement here: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS0987.pdf#page=1

    Patrick Kenny of Craanford, Gorey was a member of the Irish Volunteers in Gorey from 1914 and later was also a member of the North Wexford Brigade. Another fascinating account can be found here: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1174.pdf#page=1

    Laurence Redmond of Kilmuckridge, Gorey was a member of the I.R.B. from 1912. He joined the irish Volunteers in 1914 and became a member of the North Wexford Brigade during the War of Independence years. His personal recollections can be viewed here: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1010.pdf#page=5

    Many other people from the Gorey area took part in activities and mentions of them can be found in the above links. Not all gave ‘Witness Statements’ to the Bureau of Military History due to choice and many others had passed away when they were being compiled in the late 1940’s and 1950’s. Several other accounts of activities in the Gorey area can be found here: http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/index.html

  6. Ivan Lennon February 7, 2013 at 2:51 pm

    Wonderful article on an organisation deserving of greater attention

    Query re Fianna medal: Does it only exist in miniature (i.e., much smaller than
    Black and Tan medal etc)?

    • admin February 7, 2013 at 4:29 pm

      THE FIANNA MEDAL WAS ONLY ISSUED IN THE SMALL SIZE

  7. kevin molloy February 3, 2013 at 2:38 pm

    Any information about any Volunteers that came from the north wexford (Gorey) area would be gratefully appreciated

    thanks

    Kevin

    • Eamon Murphy February 6, 2013 at 3:40 am

      My reply seems to have been gobbled up by some gremlins. I will post it again when I get home. I posted up details of Gorey Volunteers.

      • Eamon Murphy February 7, 2013 at 10:23 am

        Kevin, sorry I have tried again and it won’t let me post for some reason, perhaps it was too long. Anyway I have contacted Garry who is the head of the site and I will email the reply to him and he can post it up.

  8. Christine Ni Raghaillaigh December 12, 2012 at 4:49 pm

    Question re photo of Fianna Eireann with flag. Would anyone be able to identify the man in the bright coloured clothing at the front of the photo and where the photo was taken?

    Thank you – a great informative site.
    Regards
    Christine

  9. Michael McKenna December 3, 2012 at 11:46 pm

    I am researching a distant relative of mine, Robert ‘Bobbie’ Bonfield, who was killed by the bodyguards of President WT Cosgrave in controversial circumstances in March 1923. I believe Bobbie may have been a Fian, but I have been unable to substantiate this. Would anybody have any further information which could help me establish whether he was or not. He was a family friend of the MacNeills and lived in Rathmines, so might have been in the Sluagh there that was organised by Aodh Macneill.

  10. Brian Wickham October 5, 2012 at 9:46 pm

    I see you have attributed the History of the Cork Fianna article to me but really I copied it from a piece on the website which is no longer active. I only made a few corrections, but none of a factual nature. If you can find the people who were behind that Fianna website they may have some valuable information and photos for you.

  11. Anthony Mc Glynn July 22, 2012 at 2:23 am

    I was a member of Na Fianna in the 1970 I’m doing a bit of history on the 3 Fianna lad from Drumcondra Edwin Hughes, Brendan Holohan,and Joseph Rogers. They where arrester for putting up posters on the 6th October 1922 what happened next is a bit sketchy but the 3 where found dead at the Red Cow Clondalkin the next day. If any one can give me anything on these 3 lads I would love to have it.

    • Deirdre Rogers January 2, 2013 at 6:45 pm

      Hello,
      Joseph Rogers was related to my family. Unfortunately we have little or no information about him. If you discover anything we would be very grateful if you would share it with us.

  12. Steve C. June 12, 2012 at 9:00 pm

    Re: Photograph/Memorial Cards/Fianna Items
    Edwin Hughes / Joseph Rogers / Michael Holohan.
    Murdered at The Red Cow 1922

    I have an urgent request for photogrpahs for the above mentioned people
    for a TV documentary;

    Please email for details:

    marino-history@hotmail.com

    • Anthony Mc Glynn July 22, 2012 at 2:28 am

      The name is Brendan Holohan I am also doing a history of these 3 lads if you get any thing you might let me know

  13. neil o sullivan June 5, 2012 at 7:18 pm

    great information here, i was a Fian back in the 70’s in Cork and have a lot of old photos..mostly from the 50-70’s. I am researching the short life of Fian Seamus Courtney who died from complications after a hunger strike and is buried in my area, I intend re-novating his grave and monument later this summer. If anyone has any information or photos I would be grateful.

  14. costellom June 5, 2012 at 9:13 am

    I am looking for information on the formation of the Volunteers in Westport, Co Mayo. I have got a reference for the setting up of the Volunteers in Westport in 1913( no precise date) by amongst others, John P McCormack, Castlebar. (my grand father). I would dearly like some more information or leads as to where I could search further.
    Maighread Costello

  15. vincent keane May 4, 2012 at 10:36 pm

    You have omitted the three Fianna boys murdered at The Red Cow, Naas road, Dublin in October 1922. Hughes, Holihan and Rogers. Bobby Bonfield also had been a member of Na fianna and was murdered at Clondalkin in March 1923. Ernie O’malleys brother, charlie was Killed at the Gresham hotel in July 1922, he was also in Fianna.

  16. Nessa April 28, 2012 at 2:57 pm

    Thank you very much for posting this. I was wondering do you know was Theo Fitzgerald living at 173 Gt. Brunswick Street? I’m doing my history project on the Fitzgerald family and have come across several references to a Theo Fitzgerald but I am not sure if it’s the same one as was living there.

    • vincent keane May 4, 2012 at 10:38 pm

      Leo & Theo fitzgerald of Pearse Street were early members of Fianna.

  17. thewinchman April 22, 2012 at 3:54 am

    Eamon, you said:
    “I am afraid I can’t comment too much on the history of the Cork Fianna, time has not permitted me to conduct research on this group yet.”

    Brian Wickham and I also have the same scroll of the Cork City Volunteers as my father was a member of Na Fianna in service on Easter Sunday 1916. His name was Thomas A. Walsh. The scroll has his name as Augustine Walsh as he was known as Gus since his father was Thomas also. I’d be interested in whatever you find as well.

    As you stated we must keep the Fianna Eireann spirit alive.

    Winch

  18. Eamon Murphy April 20, 2012 at 11:29 pm

    Great article, its great to see Fianna Eireann getting some more recognition and acknowledgment. For so long they have been overlooked.
    I am presently busy on a piece of work about Fianna Eireann and one of its prominent early members.

    There are one or two inaccuracies in your article which is forgiven as it is a large piece of work that you have undertaken. There are also not many sources out there on the subject of Fianna Eireann.

    There were actually five Fianna Eireann representatives on the Provisional Committee of the Irish Volunteers; Con Colbert, Michael Lonergan, Eamon Martin, Liam Mellows and Padriag O’Riain. They were all elected to the Executive Council at the first Volunteer convention. These five men also formed the military sub-committee of the Irish Volunteers and as the first officers of the Volunteers, directed training of the organisation.
    You could also say six if you include Bulmer Hobson who was still associated with Fianna Eireaann at that time as one of the organisations leaders.

    The Fianna organised into brigades and battalions in 1915 to bring the organisation in line with the Volunteers.

    The Fianna Eireann handbook was produced by Padraig O’Riain and not Seamus O’Riain. This inaccuracy has been on Wikipedia for a while now and other sites seem to have picked up on it as fact. It was also produced in 1910 and not 1913.

    The trek (not treck) cart used by the Fianna at the Howth Gun running was used for ammunition and not surplus rifles. They were the most reliable of men (or boys) so the job of carrying the ammunition was entrusted and assigned to them. It was feared that if the largely undisciplined and disorganised men of the Volunteers got their hands on the ammunition then all hell would break loose (This was still in the early months of the Volunteers original formation you have to remember).

    “A provisional governing committee was set up in Dublin in May 1916, including Eamon Martin, Seamus Pounch, Theo Fitzgerald, Liam Staines and Joe Reynolds. All had evaded the round-up after the Rising. This committee functioned until January 1917, when it handed over command to the newly released senior officers.” – This is not strictly true, while a temporary committee was set up in the aftermath of the Rising, consisting of the above mentioned members, Eamon Martin continued as Chief of Staff up until 1921. He was the most senior member and officer of the Fianna left as Con Colbert and Sean Heuston were executed and Padraig O’Riain left or had little participation in the organisation there after. Also Liam Mellows had left for America. Eamon was appointed Commandant O/C of the Dublin Brigade of Fianna Eireann in August 1915 and still held this position post Rising. Eamon Martin was also still a senior member of the Volunteers and the I.R.B.

    All in all it is a great peice of work and I am sorry to seem finicky about some of the details but I have been researching Fianna Eireann for about 12 years now and it is a subject close to my heart. I am afraid I can’t comment too much on the history of the Cork Fianna, time has not permitted me to conduct research on this group yet.

    Well done on a detailed and well illustrated article and thank you for helping to keep the Fianna Eireann spirit alive.

    Eamon

    • admin April 21, 2012 at 10:30 am

      Hello Eamon,thank you for the great information,please add to it as we go along.Where there are mistakes they need to be corrected.The importance of the Fianna as you say is hugely overlooked.
      IVCO

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