Gerald Keogh, shot at College Green by a sniper in Trinity College 1916. I have a great story on this young Volunteer. He was delivering dispatches at the time he was shot.

//Gerald Keogh, shot at College Green by a sniper in Trinity College 1916. I have a great story on this young Volunteer. He was delivering dispatches at the time he was shot.

By | 2012-03-24T20:55:06+00:00 March 24th, 2012|5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Maelduin July 6, 2014 at 2:22 pm

    He’s here in the 1911 census, aged 17 http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000138302/ in No 25.1 in Elmgrove (Rathmines & Rathgar East, Dublin

  2. Maelduin July 6, 2014 at 2:11 pm

    Incidentally, there’s a History Ireland piece about this lad’s tragic death. http://www.historyireland.com/20th-century-contemporary-history/well-dressed-and-from-a-respectable-street/

  3. Maelduin July 6, 2014 at 2:05 pm

    Was Gerald Keogh married to this witness?

    http://bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS0273.pdf#page=6

  4. aengus o snodaigh February 22, 2014 at 10:07 am

    From Margaret Skinnider’s Doing my Bit for Ireland
    In the House of Commons shortly after the Rising, the cabinet was questioned if it were true that the body of a boy in the uniform of the Irish Volunteers had been unearthed in the grounds of Trinity College, with the marks of 20 bayonet wounds upon him.
    “No,” was the response, “there were not 20; there was only 19”!
    The body in question was that of Gerald Keogh, one of a family passionately devoted to the cause of Irish freedom. He had been sent to Kimmage to bring back 50 men. He went scouting ahead of them, just as I had done when I brought in the men from the Leeson Street Bridge. As he was passing Trinity College, held by the British, he was shot down and swiftly captured. It is generally understood he was asked for information, and that, upon his refusing to answer, the soldiers tried to force him by prodding him with their bayonets. I might add that the 50 men with him were not attacked as they went by.
    This boy’s brother was also captured by British soldiers, who decided to hang him then and there. He begged them to shoot him, but they fastened a noose around his neck and led him to a lamp post. Fortunately an officer came along at that moment and rescued him. Even children were not safe from being terrorised by the soldiers, as Mr Dillon later brought out in the House of Commons.

  5. CARO STOLLS August 18, 2012 at 6:40 pm

    Please send me your story as Gerald Keogh was my Grandfather’s brother and I am very interested

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